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Amazon's $ 599 router system isn't low cost, nevertheless it does assist repair your poor WiFi

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I set up Amazon's Eero Pro 6 mesh Wi-Fi system for $ 599 a few days ago and already noticed a huge improvement in my Wi-Fi at home.

You might want to try mesh networks if you know you pay for fast internet but feel like your home WiFi is slow or there are areas in your house where you can't stream movies or video chat . Wi-Fi is important these days as there are many people working or attending classes in different rooms in the house.

Mesh networks, to put it simply, place multiple WiFi routers in your home so that they cover a larger area. It works better than cheaper Wi-Fi extenders.

Amazon Eero's new model supports the latest Wi-Fi 6 standards, so you can connect more devices to Wi-Fi without so much interference. It also has better antennas than the last generation Eero 5 that I used before setting up the Eero Pro 6.

Here's what you need to know about it.

What is good

The Eero Pro 6, like other Eero products, is very easy to set up. You simply plug a hub into the modem provided by your cable company, then use an app to add the other two in different parts of your home. It does all the groundwork behind the scenes so you don't have to worry about every unit talking to each other. I set up the new system in about 10 minutes.

I pay for very fast internet at a gigabit, but I usually get Wi-Fi speeds that are about 90% slower. I live in an old house with plastered walls that really mess with the WiFi signal, even in places a few rooms away from my router.

The Eero Pro 6 has doubled or quadrupled my speed around the house, increasing it from 100Mbps to 700Mbps, depending on which room I'm in. That means I can now stream game services like Google Stadia in my living room. where I couldn't before, or download movies and apps all over the house much faster. That means my wife and I have enough speed to create multiple video streams at the same time.

I haven't had any problems with dropped connections like I sometimes did with the regular Eero 5 and its competitor Google Wi-Fi as they didn't have enough power to cover my entire home.

I don't have children old enough to use this feature, but Eero also lets you manage different people in your house and block services. For example, your kids may stop using FaceTime after a certain amount of time, or they may visit some websites that you think are inappropriate.

The regular Eero 6, which I haven't tested, works similarly, but doesn't offer as powerful an antenna or support the faster speeds I pay for from my cable company. But it can be a great alternative to the Pro model if you live in a smaller house or don't pay for gigabit internet.

What is bad?

The Eero Pro 6 is expensive. It's available for $ 479 for Black Friday but costs $ 599 otherwise. That's more than double the cost of the regular Eero 6. So only buy it if you're paying for really fast internet (at least 500Mbps) and need to cover up to 6,000 square feet.

This is geekier, but I also wish one of the access points had more ethernet ports. There are only two. You always get a faster connection when you're wired. This is best for game consoles where you need the fastest connection possible, or for things that are always connected, such as your computer. B. Smart-Light-Hubs or your work computer. I have an additional switch that I plug into the back of the Eero to solve this problem and increase the number of ethernet jacks, but it's something people interested in wired connections should know.

Sometimes your phone, tablet, or laptop will connect to the most distant Eero hotspot. I asked Eero co-founder and CEO Nick Weaver about it during a short phone conversation.

He explained that the Eero doesn't decide which gadget to connect to, it is the client device like your iPhone or tablet that decides which hotspot to use. Sometimes this device connects to the farthest device for some reason. However, Weaver told me that you can enable a feature called "Band Control" which will force your devices to use a frequency of 5 GHz, if available, to connect to the nearest hotspot. Another solution I found: turn your WiFi off and on again. However, Weaver warns that a device is being blacklisted by Wi-Fi too often and you will have to re-enter your password.

Gamers and other computer fans who are interested in certain Quality of Service or QoS settings won't find them here yet. With these you can use some devices, e.g. B. a game console or a PC, give priority over others. But Weaver told me that sometimes people forget they have a game console that uses all of the network speed and then wonder why other devices are running slow. Instead, this is intelligently managed in the background. However, Eero is testing a feature that offers more control to optimize video conferencing and gaming. Anyway, I play a lot of games and haven't had any issues with how the Eero works so this isn't a big deal to me.

Finally, Eero sells subscription services with added security features. There are plans for $ 2.99 a month or $ 9.99 a month with discounts if you sign up a full year in advance, and they come with extras like password management and ad blocking. This is how Amazon earns money with the product. It doesn't bother me very much as I don't pay for them and don't need them, but I've heard from some people who say they saw notifications on their phone to subscribe to them. Dismiss them when you don't need them.

Should you buy it?

Yes, if you're paying for really expensive home internet and you're not getting the speed you expect over Wi-Fi, consider a mesh network system like the Eero Pro 6. I've been a huge fan of Eero's products over the years and like the latest update which fixed many of the coverage issues I had myself with the regular last generation Eero 5.

But it's expensive, and unless you pay for really fast internet, don't have coverage issues, or don't need to cover a lot of space with Wi-Fi, you don't need it.

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Katherine Clark